Thursday, June 30, 2011

Buffy vs. Evil

The long awaited sixth issue of Watcher Junior is here!

Ensley Guffey, in "We Just Declared War": Buffy as General", examines the eight seasons through the lens of Military Studies. The most famous use of Military Studies to look at BtVS is Anthony H. Cordesman’s “Biological Warfare and the ‘Buffy Paradigm’” (Center for Strategic and International Studies, 2002). That article uses BtVS as a lens to examine U.S. Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) policies and preparedness, rather than military science being used to examine Buffy. There's been other articles examining the series, whether it be through the literary inheritance of Beowulf, the traditions of the just female warrior, or simply a look at the weaponry on display in the series. But Ensley's paper uses John Keegan's The Mask of Command to critique the strengths and weaknesses of Buffy's leadership style, from her continual presence amongst her troops to her puzzling decision to have the Slayer Army forgo their powers. If you wanted a nuanced look at the pros and cons of Buffy's leadership style, this article's the place to begin.

Faith Parke, meanwhile, takes a look at her namesake in “I Hope Evil Takes MasterCard”: Faith the Vampire Slayer and the Image of the Bad Girl in Society". She regards the character as an example of second wave feminism from which the show's female protagonists distance themselves.

Jared Rose takes on similar issues, as he looks at how the series represents the masquerade of femininity by Buffy, Darla and others through the prism of the feminist debates about the legitimacy of sex-workers in his “You Know, I'm Extremely Youthful. And Peppy!”: Buffy, Playing Girl, and Popular Culture Representation of Sex-Worker Feminism". Here, he finds Buffy's status as an open, complex symbol requiring thoughtful investigation more important than whether Buffy is a good girl or a bad girl.

Friday, June 17, 2011

The Mr. Pointy Award Winners!

We are extremely pleased to announce the winners of the 2010 Whedon Studies Association awards for excellence in scholarship:

Short Mr. Pointy Winner

Buckman, Alyson R. "'Go Ahead, Run Away! Say it was Horrible!': Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along-Blog as Resistant Text." Slayage: The Journal of the Whedon Studies Association 8.1 (2010): n. pag. Web.

Long Mr. Pointy Winner

Attinello, Paul, Janet K. Halfyard, and Vanessa Knights, eds. Music, Sound, and Silence in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2010. Print.

Congratulations to the winners--and all of the nominees! The quality of scholarship the jury had to select from demonstrates the clear and continued growth of Whedon Studies.

The other finalists this year were:


Short Mr. Pointy finalists:

Buckman, Alyson R. “Triangulated Desire in Angel and Buffy.” Sexual Rhetoric in the Works of Joss Whedon: New Essays. Ed. Erin B. Waggoner. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2010. 48-92. Print.

Frohard-Dourlent, Hélène. "'Lez-faux' Representations: How Buffy Season Eight Navigates the Politics of Female Heteroflexibility." Sexual Rhetoric in the Works of Joss Whedon: New Essays. Ed. Erin B. Waggoner. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2010. 31-47. Print.

Kociemba, David. “To Spoil or Not to Spoil: Teaching Television’s Narrative Complexity.” Buffy in the Classroom: Essays on Teaching with the Vampire Slayer. Eds. Jodie A. Kreider and Meghan K. Winchell. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2010. 7-21. Print.

Masson, Cynthea. “Who Painted the Lion?—A Gloss on Dollhouse’s ‘Belle Chose.’” Slayage: The Journal of the Whedon Studies Association 8.2-3 (2010): n. pag. Special Issue: Fantasy Is Not Their Purpose: Joss Whedon's Dollhouse. Eds. Cynthea Masson and Rhonda V. Wilcox. Web.

Long Mr. Pointy finalists

Comeford, Amijo and Tamy Burnett, eds. The Literary Angel: Essays on Influences and Traditions Reflected in the Joss Whedon Series. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2010. Print.

Kreider, Jodie A., and Meghan K. Winchell, eds. Buffy in the Classroom: Essays on Teaching with the Vampire Slayer . Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2010. Print.

Waggoner, Erin B, ed. Sexual Rhetoric in the Works of Joss Whedon: New Essays. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2010. Print.